Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘photography’

“One hundred twenty-five years ago, Wilson “Snowflake” Bentley took the first microphotographs of snow; 46 years later he died of pneumonia contracted while photographing snowflakes in his barn. Today, CalTech physicist Kenneth Libbrecht is carrying Bentley’s work into the 21st century — and posting the findings online.

Libbrecht’s gallery includes a remarkably beautiful photograph of the “stellar dendrite” — a many-branched, starlike form that creates the light, fluffy powder that skiers adore. You’ll also see a “hollow column” (which resembles a tiny pipette) and the superdelicate “needle” snowflake, which appears only when the temperature nears 23 degrees F. Keep looking, and you’ll find prisms, sectored plates, and the rare triangular snowflake. According to Libbrecht, each of these flakes holds about a billion billion molecules.” – – VSL

http://www.newscientist.com/gallery/dn16170-snowflakes 

Read Full Post »

“MorgueFile — which provides quickly findable, high-res digital photos, free — is a graphic designer’s dream come true.

The site archives stock photographs submitted by professional and amateur shutterbugs, all of which are ready and waiting for your commercial or personal use. (N.B.: Morgue file is a newspaper term for the stock of past issues.) There’s no sign-up, no hassle, no fuss: Just take what you need and go. But the site does recommended that you credit the photographers, or be extra-polite and shoot them an e-mail. Sounds reasonable to us — if a picture’s worth a thousand words, we’ll start with “Thanks.”” – – VSL

http://www.morguefile.com/

Read Full Post »

Science and Art merge in this magnificent medium…enjoy the wonder of micro-photography….

“Reality’s building blocks are too tiny to see, so modern scientists pursue the invisible. The Nikon Small World Competition — which celebrates the most beautiful and mesmerizing microphotography — allows the rest of us to look on in wonder.

This year, the grand prize went to an expressionistic rendering of diatoms (oceanic algae): The single-celled creatures look like glow sticks waving in the darkness. The rear legs of water boatmen — barely visible insects that lurk in ponds and streams — are equally beautiful. (An intense zoom reveals the thorny hairs that allow them to swim against strong currents.) Then there’s the so-called brainbow, which scientists created by genetically engineering neurons to emit nearly 90 different shades of fluorescent light. (The results have given researchers an unprecedented window into the highways and byways of the cortex.) These pictures may look like art, but they’re actually avant-garde science.” – – VSL

http://www.nikonsmallworld.com/gallery.php?grouping=year&year=2008&imagepos=1

Read Full Post »

“Plato insisted that the most beautiful things were invisible — that perfect forms are too perfect to see. Well, Plato would have loved the Wellcome Image competition, which limits itself tophotographs of subjects that can’t be seen by the naked eye.

This year’s winners are an eclectic bunch: Here’s a carpet of concave blood cells. There’s a collection of Vitamin C crystals (they look like seashells). And — the most memorable images — terrifying photographs of bodily decay. The photo of a prostate tumor captures metastasizing cells as they consume neighboring tissue. The breast-cancer cell looks like a shard of stained glass, and a ruptured capillary leaks blood like a broken pipe. The photographs are so beautiful, it’s easy to forget that each one is a tragic portrait — a vision of the body falling slowly apart.” – – VSL

http://www.wellcome.ac.uk/en/wia/gallery.html

Read Full Post »